Highschool Flower Power

I'm a level 4 bisexual, from the middle of Texas. I like cats and you, yes you. If you want to help me out a little or you were thinking of trying out the Feature points app my referral link for feature points is http://featu.re/ESXT7P The way my blog is set up when I reblog other peoples replies to asks it makes it look like I was the one replying to asks so sorry if it confuses you but I don't know how to fix it.

  • apple-str1der:

    tips for new freshmen!

    • no one cares about anything
    • walk on the right side of the fucking hallway 
    • dont sit in the back of the bus you gotta earn that. maybe next year, champ.
    • stop screaming. we’re all tired and miserable. 
    • GIVE ME MY LUNCH TABLE BACK 

    (via killbenedictcumberbatch)

    • 45364
  • bikiniarmorbattledamage:

    rad-and-broke:

    campdracula5eva:

    youbestnotmiss:

    smitethepatriarchy:

    viva-la-fat:

    "You’re 6’4", 240-pound Marine, and you’re injured, and you need a Marine next to you to carry you back to safety, and the Marine next to you is a 5’4" woman who weighs 115 pounds,"

    No problem.

    in before “well most women can’t do that” because NEWS FLASH most men can’t either, that’s why it’s a highly specialized career that requires a lot of devoted training

    One of my former coworkers was a very slim girl only a tad taller than me, and she was training to be a fireman, and she could lift the biggest dude on my crew like this who was around 6’5 and super bulky.One time she picked him up and ran around the crew room with him for about 5 minutes before letting him down.

    Even though I haven’t exercised in over a year—if you count DDR—and I’m incredibly petite (5’0”, 100 lbs), I can carry most guys. If they’re under 200 lbs, I can run with them on my back for 5 blocks, but I can walk for a mile. Once they’re about 250, I can only walk about a block or two before my spine feels like it’s about to break. If I were in a survival situation and their life depended on it, I could go on much further, until my legs gave out.

    It’s why I hate the bullshit that women are inherently weak. Nah, man. Nah.

    Tangentially related to the blog’s theme, but I see the “women are too weak to handle the normal armor” comment come up often enough that it made it into the Female Armor Rhetoric Bingo.

    So yeah, for the record: women are not significantly weaker than men. Especially if we talk about people with lots of training in terms of fighting and/or saving lives. Especially especially if we consider that there are techniques and moves, like this one, specifically designed for smaller people to handle some heavy weight.

    And that’s all said while we ignore that most armors are not as heavy as common myth lets us believe!

    ~Ozzie

    • 138378
    • 138378
  • takeshihongo:

    image

    image

    EVERYONE’S FAVORITE YOUTUBER FINALLY EMBRACING HIS DESTINY AS A WHINY MEN’S RIGHTS ACTIVIST AND YELLING AT PEOPLE WHO MAKE THE PRODUCTS HE CONSUMES

    I LOVE IT!

    (via floozys)

    • 2718
  • 420calum:

    So at work yesterday we only had pink spoons to hand out for the frozen yogurt and every male asked if we had a different color spoon because they did not like pink and it’s femininity and lemme tell u that this proves boys are weak and a fuckjng pink spoon proved that

    (via floozys)

    • 78358
  • shslscubadiver:

    Gotta raise up that Gay-Point-Average

    (Source: pjransone, via lavendervanillaowl)

    • 71675
    • 71675
  • archiemcphee:

    The Department of Microscopic Marvels is in awe of the work by photomicrographer Danny Sanchez, who specifically seeks out and photographs precious gems that have been rejected by jewelers because of imperfections known as inclusions. In gemology an inclusion is a characteristic enclosed within the gemstone, which can effect the clarity of the stone, and whose presence can either decrease or sometimes dramatically increase the stone’s value.

    For his project, entitled Gemstone Inclusions, Sanches uses his microphotography skills to capture the beauty of these imperfections and provide a glimpse of the fantastic and alien landscapes that exist inside the gems, much too small for our eyes to see unaided. Each a teeny weeny Fortress of Solitude.

    Head over to PetaPixel to learn about how Danny Sanchez stages and creates these marvelous photos. Then be sure to visit his own website to get a look at more of his work at a much higher resolution. He has prints available too.

    [via Design Taxi and PetaPixel]

    (via saltysalmonella)

    • 495
    • 495
  • gingerkinomiya:

    baconeatsyou:

    frecklesandmisterblueeyes:

    My house is strange. There’s me, i’m bisexual, and I live with my gay brother and my asexual fiance.
    My brother and I have the same taste in boys, but i’m really the only one who likes girls, and my fiance is generally just really excited about dragons.

    Dude I want this sitcom

    is generally just really excited about dragons

    (via princeacajou)

    • 109586
  • Red flags

    politicalsexkitten:

    "E-books aren’t *real* books"
    “TV is dumb”
    “Kim Kardashian is a slut who got lucky”
    “I hate all races equally”
    “Ugh. PC users.”
    “I love Richard Dawkins”
    “You’re too hostile. Calm down. PMS?”
    “Cops are only doing their job”
    “Rap isn’t music. Listen to classical music more”
    “America is the land of equality and opportunity”
    “TheAmazingAtheist has some good points”

    (via politicalsexkitten)

    • 3718
    • 3330
    • 3330
  • brozoi:

    kakashi is only two years older than me. im going to shit myself. this is what it means to be a grownup. i dont know ANY jutsus and i only have two years to learn over a THOUSAND

    (via yirico)

    • 1060
    • 26122
    • 26122
  • (via rnidorijima)

    • 34445
    • 34445
  • silk-ward:

    I’m not sure what this is Fashion Gems except not that fashionable. Pose like a star set i guess.

    • 1455
    • 1455
  • "

    I will admit it. I have read all three books in the Fifty Shades of Grey series.

    I am not admitting this because I am ashamed of my sexual desires or even because I feel the need to rant and rave about the poor writing quality of these books. (And it is extremely poor. I set my Kindle to count how many times the word “gasp” is used in the third book and the total was more than 70). I am admitting this because I feel the need to share my opinions about what I consider to be the incredibly — and dangerously — abusive relationship portrayed in the books.

    When I first heard about Fifty Shades of Grey and learned they began as Twilight fanfiction, I swore I would not read them. I have read all of the Twilight books and I did not enjoy them. I found the relationships between Edward and Bella and Bella and Jacob to be patronizing and emotionally abusive, and I also thought the writing was pedestrian at best and boring to read. Why would I devote the limited amount of time I have for reading for pleasure to a series like this?

    But as the dialogue about Fifty Shades of Grey increased, both in the media and amongst my friends, my curiosity was piqued. I attended a talk titled “Fifty Shades of Grey - Bad for Women, Bad for Sex” and decided that I should see what all the fuss was about.

    To quote the book, I gasped. I rolled my eyes. I even bit my lip a few times. But not for the reasons Anastasia, the protagonist, did. I did out of exasperation, boredom and disgust, but also out of fear. After reading this book series, I am deeply afraid that this type of relationship will be viewed as the romantic ideal for women. And I consider that to be extremely dangerous — much more so than anything that takes place between Christian and Anastasia in the Red Room of Pain.

    Could the character of Anastasia Steele be any more of a stereotype? She is an introvert, has low self-esteem, has abandonment issues from her father, apparently has only one close friend who bullies her and even though she works in a hardware store, she doesn’t seem to possess any self-sufficiency aside from cooking for her roommate and herself. She seems to have no sexual identity until Christian Grey enters her life and requests that she become his Submissive in a sexual relationship.

    In order to be Christian’s submissive, Anastasia is expected to sign a lengthy and detailed contract that, amongst other requirements, requires that she exercise four days a week with a trainer that Christian provides (and who will report to Christian on her progress), eat only from a list of foods Christian supplies her with, get eight hours of sleep a night and begin taking a form of birth control so Christian will not have to wear condoms. Anastasia negotiates a few terms of the contract with Christian (she only wants to work out three days a week, not four), but all of her negotiations are only within his framework — none of the terms are hers independently. Nothing in their relationship is hers as an independent.

    The character of Christian Grey is a rich, superpowered businessman who was abused as a child. He is in therapy, and Anastasia frequently references his therapist, but based on how he treats Anastasia, he doesn’t seem to be making much progress. As Anastasia’s relationship with Christian progresses, his controlling tendencies affect her life more and more. When her friend takes portraits of her for his photography exhibit, Christian buys all of them, because he does not want anyone else looking at Anastasia. (They weren’t even in a relationship when he did this.) When she is hired as an assistant at a publishing company, he buys the company — to make sure she’s “safe” working there. When she goes out to a bar with her one friend, against his wishes, he flies from New York to Washington State that same night, just to express his anger — and exercise his control over her. When she does not immediately change her name at her office (in hopes of maintaining some professional autonomy, given that he bought the company she works at), he shows up, unannounced, at her office, in the middle of her workday, to pick a fight with her. When she asks why it is so important to him that she change her name, he says he wants everyone to know she is his.

    Christian’s possession of Anastasia is the cause of much of my disgust and fear of the book’s influence on people and how they view romantic relationships. After they exchange their wedding vows, the first words he says to her are, “Finally, you’re mine.” The control he exercises over her does not reflect his love for her; it reflects his objectifying of her. Christian never views Anastasia as a person, let alone an independent woman. He wants her to obey him, and even though she refuses to include that in her wedding vows, it is exactly what she does. When her mother questions her choice to keep her wedding dress on rather than change before traveling for her honeymoon, she says, “Christian likes this dress, and I want to please him.” Her desire to try some of the “kinky fuckery” in his Red Room of Pain comes from wanting to demonstrate her love for him, not her own sexual desires.

    Wanting to please Christian apparently includes subjecting herself to verbal and emotional abuse from him ‘til death do them part, because any time she tries to stand up to him — which isn’t often — he berates her, guilt trips her and beats her down verbally until she apologizes and submits to him. After she uses the “safe word” in the Red Room of Pain so he will stop, he bemoans his sad state of mind later, mentioning that his “wife fucking safe worded him.” He is not concerned with her well-being or why she felt the need to use the safe word. He only cares about how it affects him.

    The question that I kept asking myself as I read the books was why Anastasia stayed with Christian, and the answer I found was that she has absolutely no sense of self worth. She only feels sexy when he says she is, and when he insults or patronizes her, she accepts what he says as the truth. One of the passages that disgusted me the most was when Anastasia was at a club with Christian, dancing and thinking to herself that she never felt sexy before she met him and that he had given her confidence in her body. Yes, being with a partner who frequently compliments you can increase your confidence, but Anastasia went from zero to one hundred thanks to Christian. None of that came from within herself. Because of his influence on her, nothing in her life came from herself — her job, her home, her way of life, or even her self-esteem.

    The co-dependency between Anastasia and Christian is alarming to read and even more to contemplate. When she breaks up with him at the end of the first book, the second book finds her starving herself and wasting away to nothing until he contacts her again. When she thinks his helicopter has crashed in the second book, she thinks to herself that she can’t live without him. Their marriage only comes about because he is scared she will leave him, and when she asks what she can do to prove to him she isn’t going anywhere, he says she can marry him. Yes, origins of insecurity and desperation are a great start to a healthy marriage.

    When Anastasia finds herself unexpectedly pregnant and shares the news with Christian, he rages at her, asking if she did it on purpose and storming out of the house, disappearing for hours. Even though Anastasia thinks to herself that the pregnancy happened too soon in their marriage, she never considers terminating it.

    The themes of the novel — that love alone can make someone change, that abuse from a spouse is acceptable as long as he’s great in bed, that pregnancies should always be carried to term even if the parents are not ready to be parents, and the ridiculously antiquated, Victorian idea that the love of a pure virgin can save a wayward man from himself — are irrational, unbelievable and dangerous.

    Our culture has seen a radical shift of ideals moving towards traditional gender roles and Fifty Shades of Grey is a shining example of that. Early marriage to one’s first sexual partner, having a baby even when saying neither of the partners is ready to be a parent, and submission to one’s husband as the head of the household are all aspects of life that feminists and progressive thinkers have worked to move beyond. Anastasia and Christian’s relationship is not romantic. It is abusive. The ways he tries to “keep her safe” are not masculine or sexy. They are stalking. Fearing one’s husband’s reaction to an unexpected pregnancy is not normal, because “boys will be boys.” It is sad and dangerous and should not happen in a healthy relationship.

    Fifty Shades of Grey was one of the best-selling books of the year. Sex toy classes have been inspired by it, as have new types of cocktails. The film adaptation is already in the works. I sincerely hope that honest discussion will be had about the book and that the Christian Grey ideal of romance is not one that will be perpetuated throughout our culture. The best way that can happen is through open, honest dialogue that leads to healthy relationships of two equal partners. That, in my opinion, is sexier than anything that can happen in the Red Room of Pain.

    "
    • 20335
  • deerhoof:

    sleepy n gay n feelin ok

    (via terrakion)

    • 589